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Yankee4Life

Yankee News For Yankee Fans

591 posts in this topic

Yankees' Dellin Betances says he is ready to go for MLB All-Star Game

Bombers superb setup man is having a dream season so far and is looking to contribute for the American League in his first Midsummer Classic.

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Dellin Betances, who has enjoyed a dominant first half, says he is ‘expecting to pitch’ in Tuesday’s All-Star Game.

BALTIMORE — Dellin Betances wants the spotlight on one of baseball’s biggest stages.

The Yankees’ set-up man is an All-Star for the first time and wants the chance to take on the National League’s lineup on Tuesday at Target Field in Minneapolis.

“I’m expecting to pitch,” the righthander said Sunday before the series finale between the Bombers and the Orioles at Camden Yards. “Nobody’s told me anything and I know that at times guys don’t get to pitch because they save pitchers in case of extra innings. But I’m ready to pitch. I’m going with the mind-set that I am pitching.”

Betances went into the game 4-0 with one save and a 1.46 ERA. In his 55.1 innings he has struck out a stunning 84. There’s good reason why fellow players voted him on to the team and good reason that Red Sox manager John Farrell should consider getting the 6-8 product of Grand Street Campus High in Brooklyn.

“He’s a real weapon,” Yankees closer David Robertson said.

Robertson and reliever Matt Thornton, who was an All-Star with the White Sox in 2010, have advised Betances to go into the experience looking to soak things in. Betances summed up their suggestions as “enjoy it, take a lot of pictures and have fun” but he added, “Getting into the game would be great — it’s already such an honor just to be on the team.”

Betances was scheduled to fly on Derek Jeter’s charter after the game. He will have a contingent of about 12 there including his parents, two older brothers and a younger sister.

“I hope it just doesn’t go too fast for him,” Joe Girardi said. “The things you get an opportunity to do, and he’s able to soak it in and enjoy what he’s been through in his career and the expectations and how he’s handled them and being able to burst on the scene. I hope he’s able to enjoy it, and enjoy it with his family. Because it means a lot, and it means a lot for players to the people that have helped you out along the way. You can go all the way back to your first coach. You think about those people and you're appreciative.”

Betances is looking forward to being reunited with the Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw and Padres’ Tyson Ross, who played with him for Team USA in the Junior Olympics. And he knows there will be players he’s always wanted to get to know.

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The big right-hander, a product of Brooklyn's Grand Street Campus High School, is bringing family to Minnesota, but is revving up to get a shot at the National League lineup.

“It will be cool to meet some of those guys from other teams — there’s so many great players,” he said. “I’ll meet them. I’ll pick some of their brains. It’s going to be about having fun and enjoying the experience.”

Girardi said he’d like to see Betances in the game, but he’ll be paying more attention to Jeter in his final Midsummer Classic.

“I am curious to see how it’s handled with Derek. That’s the intrigue of the game for me,” Girardi said.

Told Jeter is hoping not to be the center of attention, Girardi laughed and said, “Yeah, keep thinking that.”

Betances was selected for the team during this road trip, so he did not bring anything special.

“I’ve never been much of a picture taker so I didn't bring a camera of my own,” he said. “My brothers are bringing cameras and I'll tell them to take as many pictures of everything as they can. I'll shoot some stuff with my cell phone.

“I think it will be a lot of great memories.”

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New York Yankees starting pitcher Shane Greene delivers a pitch against the Baltimore Orioles during the first inning of a baseball game, Saturday, July 12, 2014, in Baltimore.

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Ichiro Suzuki of the New York Yankees bats against the Baltimore Orioles in the second inning during a game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on July 12, 2014 in Baltimore, Maryland.

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New York Yankees starting pitcher Shane Greene delivers a pitch against the Baltimore Orioles during the third inning of a baseball game, Saturday, July 12, 2014, in Baltimore.

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New York Yankees starting pitcher Shane Greene delivers a pitch against the Baltimore Orioles during the fifth inning of a baseball game, Saturday, July 12, 2014, in Baltimore. The Yankees won 3-0.

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Starting pitcher Shane Greene of the New York Yankees throws a pitch in the fifth inning during a game against the Baltimore Orioles at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on July 12, 2014 in Baltimore, Maryland.

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Ichiro Suzuki of the New York Yankees takes a lead off first base in the sixth inning during a game against the Baltimore Orioles at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on July 12, 2014 in Baltimore, Maryland.

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Brandon McCarthy gives Yankees strong start in Stadium debut while Brett Gardner, Carlos Beltran lead offensive attack vs. Reds

McCarthy struck out nine and did not walk anyone in his first start this year in the Bronx, allowing only six hits.

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Newly acquired Brandon McCarthy gives up just one run over six innings in first Stadium start.

For Brandon McCarthy, the trade from the going-nowhere Diamondbacks to the hopeful Yankees two weeks ago came at the right time, but not only because of the teams’ different places in the standings.

McCarthy considers himself at a point in his nine-year career where “I want to be challenged,” he says. “I want to be close to the playoffs, want to be in a market that’s difficult. I wanted that stuff to see if I could push myself to the next level.”

What bigger challenge could McCarthy face than being counted on to fill a huge hole in the Yankees’ wounded rotation? But with more performances such as his outing Saturday in the Yanks’ 7-1 victory over the Reds, McCarthy and the Bombers might get to the next level together.

McCarthy, in his second start as a Yankee and first at the Stadium, allowed one run and six hits in six innings, striking out nine and walking none. He is 1-0 with a 1.42 ERA in two starts as a Yankee since being acquired for Vidal Nuno on July 6.

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Yankees third baseman Kelly Johnson gets in on the action with a 2-RBI hit in the 6th.

Brett Gardner knocked in three runs on two sac flies and an RBI single and Carlos Beltran, who was just activated Friday from the seven-day concussion disabled list, slugged his 10th homer. Kelly Johnson had a two-run single, Brian Roberts scored three times and the Yanks capitalized on a break when Jay Bruce dropped a routine fly ball, leading to a run.

The victory pushed the Yankees to 49-47 and they’ve beaten the Reds in each of the first two games of a 10-game home stand that could put their playoff chances into sharper focus.

The 31-year-old McCarthy was in the midst of a rough season in Arizona, bringing a 3-10 record to the Bronx. But he feels like his stuff was improving toward the end of his Diamondbacks’ tenure and he’s eager to embrace this fresh start.

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Derek Jeter collects an RBI hit in the 5th as balanced Yankee attack scores 7 runs.

He says he at least is starting to “feel like myself again and really start with a new page, where you get to prove yourself and everything that happened earlier this season is gone. It’s been a really nice, clearing mental week or two.”

While McCarthy was having a mostly easy time on the mound with the Reds, his wife, Amanda, was experiencing some of the challenges of the Bronx — she was tweeting about being stuck in traffic on the Major Deegan Expressway en route to the game. Told about it, McCarthy, an avid tweeter himself, chuckled.

McCarthy had his own solution — he says he doesn’t plan to drive to work much. “It’s a little different than Arizona,” he said.

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Brian Roberts makes a diving stop on a ground ball by Cincinnati Reds' Billy Hamilton.

He certainly solved the challenge of the Reds with little problem. He gave up a solo homer to Chris Heisey in the fifth inning, but not much else. He threw a fastball past Brayan Pena for the final out of the sixth, stranding two runners and completing his day in fine fashion.

It’s the fourth time in his career McCarthy has struck out at least nine without walking anyone, and Saturday was the first time a Yankee pitcher had accomplished that since CC Sabathia did it against the Red Sox on May 31, 2013.

“He was really good,” Joe Girardi said. “He used his fastball extremely effectively . . . located and located down in the corners and had a good sinker.”

McCarthy was happiest about his cutter, actually, a pitch the Diamondbacks had wanted him to abandon. His cutter and sinker can work in concert together, and the Yankees urged McCarthy to throw it more.

“I need it to be successful,” McCarthy said.

McCarthy was also careful not to think about the crowd of 47,606 in the stands or the fact that he was wearing the pinstripes for the first time. “The second you get swept away, you lose your focus, and that’s a good way to make sure your (Stadium) debut is a bad one,” he said.

He doesn’t have to worry about that. Is his next stop the next level?

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Brandon McCarthy of the New York Yankees delivers a pitch in the first inning against the Cincinnati Reds on July 19, 2014 at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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Carlos Beltran of the New York Yankees hits a solo home run in the second inning on July 19, 2014 at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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Brett Gardner of the New York Yankees hits an RBI single in the third inning on July 19, 2014 at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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Brian Roberts of the New York Yankees hits and reaches second on a fielding error in the third inning on July 19, 2014 at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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Derek Jeter of the New York Yankees tries to make the catch against the Cincinnati Reds on July 19, 2014 at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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Derek Jeter of the New York Yankees steals second in the fifth inning as Kris Negron of the Cincinnati Reds is unable to make the tag on July 19, 2014 at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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Yankees sweep Reds thanks to Brian McCann’s walk- off bloop single against Aroldis Chapman

Jacoby Ellsbury won a nine-pitch battle against the flamethrowing Reds closer by singling to left field. He stole second, took third on a wild pitch and scored on the single.

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Jacoby Ellsbury goes 4-for-4 with two stolen bases and scores the winning run Sunday.

The run may have begun.

The definition of mediocre with a 47-47 mark at the All-Star break, the Yankees have charged out for the second half looking to make a drive into the playoffs. The Bombers completed a three-game sweep of the Reds on Sunday, getting to Cincinnati’s flame-throwing Aroldis Chapman for a run in a walk-off 3-2 victory before 43,115 at the Stadium.

Jacoby Ellsbury capped a 4-for-4 afternoon by prevailing through a nine-pitch battle against Chapman — each pitch clocking over 100 mph — that ended with a single to left to start the ninth. He stole second base and took third on a wild pitch before, one out later, Brian McCann’s towering popup touched down on the grass behind first base when none of the three converging fielders went for the catch.

“I saw everybody was looking at each other and there was a chance,” McCann said, referring to first baseman Todd Frazier, second baseman Skip Schumaker and right fielder Jay Bruce. “Luckily for us it fell.”

“I thought I was under it and I was not,” Frazier said. “By the time the ball was coming down it was already too late. . . . I made a mistake, turned my body the wrong way and (it’s) one of those things where I should have caught it.”

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Brian McCann’s pop-up in the ninth inning falls between Skip Schumaker (l.) Todd Frazier (c.) and Jay Bruce.

The Yankees underperformed at home before the break, going 18-23. They resumed with 40 of their final 68 to be played at the Stadium and have won the first three.

“We’ve been winning a lot of games on the road. At home we should win more games,” said David Robertson, whose scoreless ninth earned a win. “It just hasn’t worked out that way. It’s only a matter of time.”

“We’re going to have to win at home; our team is built for this ballpark,” McCann said.

The time to make a move is now. The Yankees are three games back of Baltimore in the AL East and play 10 of their next 13 against last-place teams Texas and Boston.

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A pop-up off the bat of Brian McCann against Aroldis Chapman is the difference for the Yankees on Sunday, delivering a 3-2 walk-off win for the Bombers.

“You look at that and being home and starting to get some guys going — this is a good opportunity for us,” Joe Girardi said.

“Those are the teams you want to play and you want to win series against,” Robertson said. “Is it going to work out for us? I don’t know. But hopefully we can feed off what we did here this weekend and continue to win ballgames.”

Hiroki Kuroda sparkled as he allowed one unearned run in 6.2 innings of three-hit pitching and left with a 2-1 lead.

Dellin Betances gave up a Frazier homer in the eighth that tied it, just the second home run he has allowed in the 58.1 innings he’s pitched to a 1.54 ERA. “We were all a little bit shocked when it happened, but it just goes to show you that he’s human,” Girardi said.

A Brian Roberts error paved the way for the Reds taking a 1-0 lead in the fifth. The Yankees scored twice in the bottom of the inning, a Derek Jeter single tying the score and an Ellsbury single putting the Yanks up 2-1.

In the ninth, Ellsbury got his first-ever look at Chapman and his blazing fastball.

“It lessens your reaction time. You don’t have much time to think,” he said. “You’ve got to go up there trusting your hands, get your swing ready earlier. I think that’s the first time I’ve seen a pitcher throwing 102 and it’s fun. . . . Fortunately I fouled off some pitches to get a pitch I could hit.”

Ellsbury’s considerable speed took control of the game. On the second pitch to Mark Teixeira he stole his 26th base, his jump so good the Reds didn’t even throw down to second. Three pitches later — Teixeira still up — Chapman threw the wild pitch and he took third.

“He’s the guy that you want because you know he knows what he’s doing and he can steal . . . in that situation,” Girardi said.

Said McCann: “He can do anything on a baseball field you could ever want to do. He showed all his tools today. He set the tone: getting on, stealing second, third on a wild pitch. He gives us a chance.”

More chances lie ahead. The playoff drive may be on.

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Ellsbury solves Reds’ stud closer, then uses legs to help Yanks win

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Jacoby Ellsbury bats during the ninth inning, where he'd single off Cincinnati's hard-throwing closer, Aroldis Chapman, and eventually score the winning run.

Facing Cincinnati closer Aroldis Chapman and his 102 mph fastball, the Yankees’ Jacoby Ellsbury explained, is just as much a mental exercise as physical.

“Well, it just lessens your reaction time,” Ellsbury said. “You don’t have much time to think.”

Or to pray.

“You just have to go up there trusting your hands, get your swing ready a little bit earlier,” Ellsbury said. “I think that’s the firmest I’ve seen a pitcher throwing 102. Yeah, it’s firm.”

So Ellsbury trusted his hands and his reactions and led off the bottom of the ninth with a single, his season high-tying fourth hit of the game. From there, he trusted his legs and his instincts.

Ellsbury stole second against the lefty Chapman, then advanced to third on a wild pitch and eventually scored the winning run on Brian McCann’s dunk single that fell among three Reds in short right field as the Yankees completed a three-game sweep with a 3-2 victory Sunday at Yankee Stadium.

“It’s not every day you see someone throwing 102. You just try to put a good at-bat together, hope to put something hard in play,” Ellsbury said. “Fortunately, I fouled some pitches to get a pitch I could hit.

“Just trying to relax, not do too much. Someone is throwing that hard you want to be nice and relaxed, maybe shorten up your swing a little bit.”

Ellsbury strung together a terrific at bat. He sent Chapman’s ninth pitch, a mere 101 mph offering, into left to ignite the winning sequence.

“That’s a guy throwing 100 mph plus. Stay in there, foul off some pitches,” manager Joe Girardi said, explaining the approach, leaving out the part about wearing body armor and a triple-lined helmet.

And once Ellsbury was aboard, Chapman was essentially swatting at a mosquito in a swamp.

“In that situation, [you’re] just trying to scrape one run across, I’m trying to get in scoring position as fast as possible. Good thing I did,” said Ellsbury who previously had two singles — one for a fifth-inning RBI — a double and a walk.

“He can do anything on the base paths. He showed off all his tools today, set the tone,” McCann said.

“That’s a big deal. You know he knows what he’s doing,” Girardi said of Ellsbury reaching base. “He can steal second, steal third.”

Or steal second and move up on a wild pitch. McCann then delivered the one-out game-ending hit for the sweep.

“Guys [in] the last three games have put tremendous at-bats together, one through nine in the lineup. When you do that good things happen,” Ellsbury said. “It just makes it tough on the opposing pitchers.”

Even the ones throwing 102 mph.

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Newcomers to rotation thriving for Yankees

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Brandon McCarthy and Shane Greene have helped a Yankees rotation which is currently without four-fifths of its Opening Day starting rotation.

You don’t have to be a baseball lifer to recognize the ramifications of a team losing four-fifths of its projected starting rotation to injury even before the All-Star break.

But you also don’t have to spend 24/7 around a ballpark to know that in losing the present-day version of CC Sabathia, Ivan Nova and Michael Pineda in addition to Masahiro Tanaka, the Yankees haven’t exactly been deprived of sending David Cone, David Wells and Orlando Hernandez to the mound every fifth day.

Maybe down the road the lack of pedigree in the rotation will become a significant impediment in the hunt for a playoff spot. Maybe a staff with a handful of starters who would have seemed more at home in split-squad games in March in Tampa than in pennant-chase baseball in July and August in The Bronx will eventually undermine the Yankees.

But not yet. And not this weekend, which concluded with Sunday’s 3-2 victory at the Stadium over the Reds that completed a three-game sweep in which the Yankees were gifted with quality starts from first David

Phelps, then Brandon McCarthy and finally Hiroki Kuroda, who combined to surrender a sum of three earned runs in 19 innings of work.

“To be honest, our guys have been doing it all year,” said Brian McCann, who brought home Jacoby Ellsbury from third base with the winning run in the bottom of the ninth when his pop fly into shallow right fell among three befuddled Cincinnati fielders. “Our pitchers have been consistent all season long.”

Whether the originals or the replacements, the starters other than Tanaka have not been dominant. But they have been respectable. They have given the Yankees a chance to at least remain part of the postseason conversation in a season during which mystique and aura appear only on the scoreboard video screens and on designated plaque days.

The Yankees have gotten essentially middle-of-the-road work from the rotation overall, the starters tied for the seventh-best ERA in the AL (3.92) and the 11th-most innings in the league. But it’s been better lately, noticeably better, with their starters having surrendered three earned runs or fewer in each of the last eight games, compiling a 1.99 ERA over that span.

That would be from the firm of Kuroda, McCarthy, Phelps, Shane Greene and Chase Whitley, and in the eight games since Tanaka’s last start in Cleveland on July 8.

“These guys have the ability to step up; they do,” Joe Girardi said after the victory gave his team a three-game winning streak for the first time in a month. “They have to understand that if they make their pitches, they’re going to get people out.

“I’ve said that for us to make noise, we have to get distance out of them.”

Kuroda, who was touched for one unearned run in 6 ²/₃ innings before yielding to Dellin Betances, was masterful in limiting the Reds to three hits, mixing his sinker, slider and splitter effectively throughout. At 39, he is the lone man standing from the original starting five.

“I’ve thought about that more than once, that the last guys standing is the oldest,” Girardi said. “It’s partly [due to] how he conditions himself. It’s also partly genetic.”

A year ago, Kuroda faded down the stretch, going 0-6 with 6.56 ERA over his final eight starts. Girardi has responded by, if not babying Kuroda, then by monitoring him closely. Of course he has. That’s called managing.

“You have to be cautious, but maybe we can push him a little more,” Girardi said. “If he’d been overworked and not pitching as well, people would want to know why, and it [would be] because he’s overworked. It’s a fine line.”

Kuroda has thrown 123 innings, 20th most in the league, after throwing 201 innings last season and a career-high 219 two years ago.

“How I am used is up to the manager,” Kuroda said. “You can’t replace any of my teammates, but when you go to the mound you have to make sure you give your team a chance to win.

“Injuries or not, I take pride in taking responsibility.”

In 2005, original rotation members Carl Pavano, Jaret Wright and Kevin Brown all went down with injuries.

So after a spell did Chien-Ming Wang. The Yankees traded for Shawn Chacon and promoted Aaron Small, who responded by going a combined 17-3 and helping lead the team to the AL East title even though only Randy Johnson and Mike Mussina were healthy enough to make 30 starts.

This isn’t then, when the Yankees bludgeoned their way to the postseason. But it does prove that it can be done, and that a team can overcome.

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Hiroki Kuroda of the New York Yankees pitches against the Cincinnati Reds during their game at Yankee Stadium on July 19, 2014 in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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Jacoby Ellsbury of the New York Yankees drives in a run with a single in the fifth inning against the Cincinnati Reds during their game at Yankee Stadium on July 19, 2014 in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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Jacoby Ellsbury of the New York Yankees gets a hit in the ninth inning against the Cincinnati Reds during their game at Yankee Stadium on July 19, 2014 in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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Brian McCann of the New York Yankees drives in the game winning run with a single in the ninth inning against the Cincinnati Reds during their game at Yankee Stadium on July 19, 2014 in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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Chase Headley drives in winning run in debut as Yankees walk off with win over Rangers

'I’m excited to be here,' Headley said after being doused with Gatorade by Brett Gardner. 'I can’t wait to help and do my job.'

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Chase Headley makes a splash in his Yankee debut, throwing his arm in the air while celebrating his game-winning single.

Welcome to New York, Chase Headley.

Less than 12 hours after being traded, the newest Yankee made his presence felt immediately, lifting the Bombers to a 2-1 walk-off victory over the Rangers with a single in the 14th inning.

“There’s a lot of nerves there,” Headley said. “But I kind of stepped out of the box and I thought to myself, ‘Why not? Why wouldn’t this day go this way?’ I was able to enjoy it.”

Jacoby Ellsbury singled in the tying run against closer Joakim Soria in the bottom of the 13th to give the Bombers new life, setting up Headley’s big moment.

“When I found out (about the trade), obviously you have mixed emotions when you’ve been at a place for as long as I’ve been in San Diego,” Headley said. “But I couldn’t be happier to be a Yankee. It’s unbelievable. I can’t even believe I’m saying that. Long day, but great way to finish.”

The Yankees’ comeback was necessary after J.P. Arencibia took David Huff deep to lead off the 13th for the game’s first run.

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Chase Headley (c.) celebrates with his new teammates and manager Joe Girardi.

“I’ve said it all along; they fight,” Joe Girardi said. “This team doesn’t give up.”

Headley landed at LaGuardia Airport around 6:30 p.m., arriving at the Stadium about a half-hour into the game. He changed quickly into his new pinstripes and walked into the dugout, introducing himself to his new teammates before settling in for the game.

Headley got the call to pinch-hit for Zelous Wheeler in the eighth, striking out in his first at-bat. He grounded out in both the 11th and the 12th, the latter with two out and the bases loaded in the scoreless game.

“You’ve got to want to be up in that spot,” Headley said. “Had a chance earlier, wasn’t able to get it done. I was fortunate to come back around and have (another) opportunity.”

The Yankees acquired Headley from the Padres on Tuesday afternoon for infielder Yangervis Solarte and minor-league pitcher Rafael De Paula. The Yankees also received $1 million from San Diego to pay part of the $4 million still owed to Headley this season.

“We think he’s an upgrade,” general manager Brian Cashman said. “We feel like we’re at least getting an average everyday major-leaguer at that position and maybe more. We’ll see.”

Headley had a breakout season in 2012, batting .286/.376/.498 with 31 home runs and a National League-best 115 RBI, finishing fifth in NL MVP voting while winning a Gold Glove and Silver Slugger. He’s posted a .243/.330/.384 slash line with 20 homers and 82 RBI in 218 games since the start of last season while battling a number of injuries. The 30-year-old landed on the disabled list with a calf injury in late-April and has dealt with knee, bicep and back issues this season.

Headley had an epidural injection on June 20 for a herniated disc in his back, a shot that Cashman believes helped him regain his stroke as he hit .298/.330/.405 in his previous 21 games.

Cashman had been trying to acquire Headley for the past three weeks, although a source said the GM was also trying to pry outfielder Chris Denorfia away from the Padres before making the deal for Headley.

Headley, who is making $10.5 million this season, will be a free agent at the end of the year. Asked whether this should be viewed as an audition for a new contract, Cashman — who will have Alex Rodriguez returning from his suspension next season — sidestepped the topic.

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Yankees catcher Francisco Cervelli tags Rangers’ Robinson Chirinos out at the plate on Daniel Robinson's fifth-inning single.

“I can’t predict 2015 and what our needs will or won’t be,” Cashman said. “That’s not what this is all about.”

Solarte hit .254 with six home runs and 31 RBI in 75 games this season, although his production dropped off dramatically in the past two months. De Paula, 23, was 6-5 with a 4.15 ERA in 20 games (17 starts) with Class-A Tampa this season.

Headley’s name surfaced as a possible trade target after the 2012 season when A-Rod underwent his second hip surgery, but the price would have been astronomical following Headley’s monster season.

“If I had a vacancy at third base, which clearly I had, then I’m sure I inquired about him, yes,” Cashman said. “But he was an easier get this time than when I made that call, clearly.”

The Yankees have now made two trades in the past two weeks to bolster their roster, acquiring Headley and Brandon McCarthy without giving up any of their top prospects.

“We’re hoping that we can get a jolt from every single addition that we bring in here,” Cashman said. “We’re going keep sifting through it and try to find ways to improve this club so we can get the team where it needs to be, which is qualifying for the playoffs.”

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Whitley starts second half in style with six-plus shutout innings

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Chase Whitley

Chase Headley’s game-winning hit will be the lasting memory from his Yankees debut, but Chase Whitley’s unexpectedly strong pitching performance is what the team will need to stay in contention in the second half of the season.

Making his first appearance since the All-Star break, the rookie right-hander snapped out of a month-long slump, turning in what may have been the best start of his young career, as he threw six-plus shutout innings while striking out six in the Yankees’ night’s 2-1, 14-inning win over the Rangers Tuesday night in The Bronx.

“I went into this one like it was a new beginning, the second half of the season,” Whitley said. “I felt good. I felt like I was in command.”

With 80 percent of the starting rotation on the disabled list, Whitley finally gave the Yankees what they needed, though the 25-year-old received nothing in return.

Pitching at least five innings for the first time since June 18, Whitley (4-3) allowed seven hits, but threw the longest scoreless outing of his career, giving the Yankees anemic offense plenty of time to offer support. Instead, the lineup went 12 innings without scoring a run, amassing only four hits through the first 11 innings.

Struggling over his past four starts, Whitley showed resilience from the beginning, brushing aside his ballooned ERA of 5.10 and bringing back the success of his first seven starts, when he posted a 2.56 ERA. Following Tuesday’s no-decision, Whitley’s ERA dropped to 4.60.

“He was great,” manager Joe Girardi said. “He had an outstanding performance tonight, got into the seventh inning for us.

“I thought his stuff was really sharp. I thought his changeup was really good. I thought his slider was sharp and I think the rest helped him.”

Whitley was tested several times, surrendering a leadoff hit in each of the first four innings.

In the second inning, Leonys Martin opened with a leadoff single, in which the center fielder took an extra base after Zelous Wheeler’s throwing error. Though Martin reached third after a wild pitch with no outs, Whitley recovered, inducing a ground ball from J.P. Arencibia, striking out Robinson Chirinos and getting another ground ball from Rougned Odor to end the inning unscathed.

Whitley would leave the scoreless tie in the seventh inning, after giving up a leadoff single to Adrian Beltre, having thrown 75 pitches.

“The workload had gotten to me a little bit, but today I was able to attack from pitch one,” Whitley said. “I was just getting ahead of hitters, attacking and being aggressive. Other than that, it was really nothing different.

“When you go through struggles, it’s a test of character. You got to get through it. You just have to keep battling.Even when times weren’t good out there, I just felt like I was battling.”

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Yankees 1B Mark Teixeira to miss 3-4 games with mild lower lat strain

Teixeira, the team leader in RBI (48) and home runs (17), says the injury has bothered him on and off since the Bombers played in Oakland in mid-June. He expected to get a PRP shot later Monday night.

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Mark Teixeira continues to be nagged by injuries, this time a lower lat strain will keep him out at least 3-4 days.

Four days into the second half of the season, the injury bug has bitten the Yankees once again.

Mark Teixeira was out of the lineup on Monday night against the Rangers with a mild, Grade 1 strain in the lower lat muscle on the left side of his back. Joe Girardi says he intends to rest Teixeira for three or four days, but does not believe the slugger will need to be placed on the disabled list.

“I thought the year off last year would give me a fountain of youth, (but) it’s just made me rusty,” said Teixeira, who missed the bulk of last season with a torn tendon sheath in his right wrist. “The pain really ratcheted up in the last few days. That’s when we decided to get the MRI because something wasn’t right.”

Teixeira, the team leader in RBI (48) and home runs (17), says he has been dealing with back spasms since the Bombers played in Oakland in mid-June and that the area has bothered him ever since. He expected to get a PRP shot later Monday night.

Though the Yanks swept the Reds over the weekend, Teixeira finished 0-for-12 in the series with five strikeouts. Girardi was asked whether he felt as though the injury could explain Teixeira’s recent struggles.

“I don’t know. It could be,” Girardi said. “These guys right now are always dealing with aches and pains. It’s been his lat. There’s been a couple of other little things, his neck was kind of stiff a day, so you don’t know if it’s all related.”

“I think if we were concerned, really concerned, we’d put him on the DL right away,” he continued. “We’re hoping that after three or four days maybe he feels okay and maybe we can get him back in there.”

The Yankees have been hit the hardest by injuries to their rotation, with CC Sabathia (knee), Masahiro Tanaka (elbow) Ivan Nova (elbow) and Michael Pineda (shoulder) all being shelved with various ailments. But position players have also nursed injuries throughout the year, including Teixeira, who missed 14

games with a right hamstring strain in April. Teixeira played in over 150 games in each of his first three seasons with the Yankees, but has struggled to stay healthy since.

“When I went down in Toronto with that adductor, hamstring thing, it was like, man, it shouldn’t be this hard to play baseball any more,” Teixeira said. “But you grind through it, and hopefully when you are out there, you’re productive. It may not be for 160 games anymore, but when I’m out there, I want to produce for my team.”

With Teixeira unavailable, Girardi turned to Kelly Johnson to start at first. Entering Monday night, Johnson was batting .189 with two homers and 10 RBI in 25 games as the Yankees first baseman. Brian McCann, Francisco Cervelli, Brendan Ryan and

Carlos Beltran have also all played first this year and could conceivably start there if needed. The Yankees hope, obviously, is that a replacement won’t be needed for too long.

Despite the various injuries plaguing his club, Girardi says there is no room for excuses in the Yankees clubhouse.

“I’ve always said it’s an opportunity for other people when you deal with injuries and it’s an opportunity to prove yourself for some younger players that might get called up a little bit before people expect them to,” Girardi said. “I think you just have to have the attitude that no matter what happens, we’re going to press on.

We’re out there to win games and that’s what we’re going to do. We’re not going to make excuses because obviously nobody’s going to feel sorry for us. … These are grown men playing the game and you have to find a way.”

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With Texas Rangers Shin Soo-Choo on first base, New York Yankees starting pitcher Chase Whitley delivers in a baseball game at Yankee Stadium in New York, Tuesday, July 22, 2014.

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Zelous Wheeler of the New York Yankees celebrates after making the last out of the second inning against the Texas Rangers on July 22, 2014 at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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Robinson Chirinos of the Texas Rangers heads for home but is out by Francisco Cervelli of the New York Yankees in the fifth inning on July 22, 2014 at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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New York Yankees pitcher Jeff Francis delivers in the 14th inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers at Yankee Stadium in New York, Tuesday, July 22, 2014. The Yankees defeated the Rangers 2-1 on a walk-off by Chase Headley, acquired Tuesday from the San Diego Padres.

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Newly acquired New York Yankees Chase Headley hits a game-winning, walk-off, RBI single off Texas Rangers reliever Nick Tepesch in a baseball game at Yankee Stadium in New York, Wednesday, July 23, 2014.

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New York Yankees Chase Headley celebrates after hitting a 14th-inning walk-off RBI single in the Yankees 2-1 victory over the Texas Rangers in a baseball game at Yankee Stadium in New York, Wednesday, July 23, 2014.

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Brandon McCarthy sharp again as Yankees win third- straight, beat Texas Rangers 4-2

The Bombers only managed six hits, but made them count as Brett Gardner, Chase Headley, Francisco Cervelli and Brian McCann drove in a run apiece to pace the offense.

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Brandon McCarthy allows one run over six innings for his second win with the Yankees.

The Yankees viewed Brandon McCarthy as an upgrade to their pitching staff when they acquired him less then three weeks ago.

They probably didn't think he would become their new ace.

The righthander pitched his third strong game in a row, holding the Rangers to one run over six innings to lead the Yankees to a 4-2 win in front of 45,105 at the Stadium.

McCarthy improved to 2-0 with a 1.45 ERA since being acquired from the Diamondbacks for Vidal Nuno on July 6, helping make up for the loss of Masahiro Tanaka to a small ligament tear in his right elbow.

The Yankees' lineup had only six hits in the game, but they made them count as Brett Gardner, Chase Headley, Francisco Cervelli and Brian McCann drove in a run apiece to pace the offense.

Adam Warren allowed a solo homer by J.P. Arencibia in the seventh to pull the Rangers within a run, but he retired the next two batters before Matt Thornton, Dellin Betances and David Robertson (25th save) recorded the final seven outs to end the game.

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Derek Jeter takes a day off and has a front-row seat for Brandon McCarthy's third strong outing in pinstripes.

After losing the series-opener, the Yankees came back to win three straight, giving them six wins in the first seven games of the home stand. They host the Blue Jays in a three-game set this weekend before heading on the road for six games in Texas and Boston next week.

McCarthy was 1-0 with a 1.42 ERA in his first two starts since being traded to the Yankees, effectively mixing his cutter in with his two-seamer and four-seamer.

He retired the first six batters he faced and got a double play to erase a leadoff walk in the third, but Rougned Odor and Shin-Soo Choo singled with two out, setting up Elvis Andrus' bloop single to give the Rangers a 1-0 lead.

Colby Lewis, who beat the Yankees twice in the 2010 ALCS, had struggled badly this season to the tune of a 6.37 ERA in 17 starts. The Yankees made him look like his vintage self in the early innings, going hitless through the first three frames.

Gardner lit a spark with a leadoff double in the fourth, scoring on Headley's two-out single to tie the game.

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Brett Gardner goes 1-for-3 Thursday with a run scored and an RBI.

Lewis ran into more trouble in the fifth, starting with a leadoff walk of Ichiro Suzuki. Cervelli laced a double into the left-field corner, scoring Ichiro from first to give the Yankees their first lead.

Brendan Ryan bunted Cervelli to third, where Gardner brought him home with a two-out sac fly to push the lead to two.

McCarthy blanked the Rangers over the next three innings, working around a two-out jam in the fifth by striking out Andrus with runners at first and second.

Arencibia cut the lead to one with his seventh-inning homer off Warren, but McCann added an insurance run in the eighth with an RBI double, giving Robertson a two-run lead to protect.

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Yankees scouting Ian Kennedy for possible trade reunion

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Ian Kennedy of the Padres came to the majors with the Yankees.

Having already completed a deal with the Padres for third baseman Chase Headley, the Yankees are monitoring what the NL West club is going to do with right-hander Ian Kennedy before the July 31 deadline.

The Yankees had scout Joe Caro at Wrigley Field Wednesday night to watch Kennedy beat the Cubs, 8-3, despite a bout of wildness. In six innings, the former Yankee allowed three runs, three hits and walked five. He is 8-9 with a 3.66 ERA in 22 games this season.

A first-round pick of the Yankees in 2006 from USC, Kennedy pitched for the Yankees from 2007 to 2009 and went to the Diamondbacks in the three-team deal that brought Curtis Granderson from the Tigers following the 2009 season.

In his last five starts for the Padres, Kennedy is 3-0 with a 1.97 ERA.

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New York Yankees' Chase Headley hits a fourth-inning RBI single, driving in Brett Gardner, in a baseball game against the Texas Rangers at Yankee Stadium in New York, Thursday, July 24, 2014.

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Jacoby Ellsbury of the New York Yankees steals second base in the fifth inning ahead of the tag from Elvis Andrus of the Texas Rangers at Yankee Stadium on July 24, 2014 in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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Ichiro Suzuki of the New York Yankees follows through on a sixth inning base hit against the Texas Rangers at Yankee Stadium on July 24, 2014 in the Bronx borough of New York City.

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New York Yankees relief pitcher Dellin Betances (68) winds up in the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers at Yankee Stadium in New York, Thursday, July 24, 2014. Betances pitched a scoreless inning and the Yankees went on to defeat the Texas Rangers 4-2.

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New York Yankees' Chase Headley, right, greets designated hitter Carlos Beltran (36) at the plate after Beltran scored on Brian McCann's eighth-inning RBI-double in a baseball game against the Texas Rangers at Yankee Stadium in New York, Thursday, July 24, 2014. The Yankees defeated the Rangers 4-2.

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New York Yankees relief pitcher David Robertson (30) delivers in the ninth inning of the Yankees 4-2 victory over the Texas Rangers in a baseball game at Yankee Stadium in New York, Thursday, July 24, 2014.

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Ichiro Suzuki goes deep with three-run blast to help Yankees top Blue Jays, 6-4

Hiroki Kuroda went 5.2 innings, allowing eight hits and one walk while striking out three.

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Ichiro Suzuki hits a three-run HR of his own in the third inning.

The Yankees might not own a potent lineup or a healthy starting rotation but they do own Mark Buehrle and the Blue Jays.

Behind Ichiro Suzuki’s first home run in nearly a year, the Bombers came from behind to beat Toronto, 6-4, at the Stadium Friday night — their 17th straight home win over their AL East rivals.

The Yanks remained three games behind the division-leading Orioles, who beat Seattle later Friday, 2-1, on Chris Davis’ 10th-inning home run, and moved a game ahead of third-place Toronto. The Bombers are also in sole possession of the AL’s second wild-card spot.

“The division is so tight right now that any game counts, so we’re happy being able to take the first one (of the series),” said Carlos Beltran, whose solo homer to left off Buehrle preceded Ichiro’s decisive blast. “Hopefully we can win tomorrow with the same intensity.”

The game got off to a rough start for Hiroki Kuroda, who surrendered a three-run homer to left by Toronto slugger Jose Bautista in the first inning. The Yankees got two runs back in the bottom of the second with an infield RBI single by Brian Roberts and a sacrifice fly to center by Brett Gardner.

Bautista homered again in the third on another Kuroda mistake for his 20th round-tripper of the season — also to left — to extend the Toronto lead to 4-2. But the Bombers struck back in the bottom half with Beltran’s blast — his 11th homer of the year — and Ichiro’s first longball of the season that broke a homerless streak of 294 at-bats dating back to last August.

“Obviously I know the stats, I knew that going in,” Suzuki said through a translator. “Now that it’s not a zero maybe (Yankee broadcaster) Michael Kay will go easy on me.”

The 40-year-old entered in a 6-for-41 (.146) slide but is hitting .431 in his career against Buehrle (25-for-58).

Kuroda (7-6, 3.99) settled down after the second Bautista homer and allowed just three more baserunners. The righty was relieved after 5.2 innings, allowing four earned runs on the two Bautista home runs, eight hits and one walk while striking out three.

“With the stuff I had, I was struggling all day, but at the same time I think I tried to hang in there. Even though I gave up the second homer, I think I was resilient,” Kuroda said through a translator. “(The Ichiro blast was) a huge homer. That sort of brought me back to life. It was a big hit.”

David Huff, Shawn Kelley and Dellin Betances combined for 2.1 scoreless innings before David Robertson nailed down his 26th save of the season with a scoreless ninth.

Buehrle (10-7), who couldn’t hold leads of 3-0 and 4-2, was tagged for six runs on nine hits and fell to 1-12 lifetime against the Yankees, who are 26-10 overall against the Blue Jays since September of 2012.

Beltran and Ichiro supplied the two big blasts, but the Yankees got other contributions from the likes of Chase Headley (3-for-4 with a double and two runs scored), Roberts (1-for-4 with an RBI) and Francisco Cervelli (2-for-3 with a double). “The bottom of our order did a lot of damage tonight,” Joe Girardi said. “There were a lot of base hits down there and they set the table a lot so that’s good to see.”

The Yankees have undoubtedly suffered from some bad luck this season with injuries but have battled to stay afloat. They are currently 7-1 since the All-Star break, a stretch that coincides with their current 10-game home stand.

“It’s part of baseball man. As a team you’re going to go through ups and downs, you’re going to go through injuries,” Beltran said. “The most important thing is we have to stick together; we have to find a way for the guys who are replacing the other guys to step in try to keep the team. Hopefully when the guys come back we’re in contention. . . . At the end of the day we have to do it with what we have.”

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Offensively challenged Yanks could turn to utilityman Pirela

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Jose Pirela.

When the Yankees spent over $450 million this past offseason, it underscored the lack of major league-ready talent in the team’s farm system.

Indeed, only one of the organization’s top 10 prospects (as rated by Baseball America) has reached so far as Triple-A this season, and that would be catcher John Ryan Murphy, who hit .286 in a brief spell in the majors earlier this season.

Despite the dearth of top prospects, there is a player at Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre who could warrant a call-up: Jose Pirela, who has shaken off a slow start (he hit .230 in his first 19 games) to post a .328 batting average since late April, with an .838 OPS.

“He’s not a bad player,” a National League scout said. “He’s a Triple-A, emergency call-up kind of guy that can help you…Not a bad player, but he’d be a utility player.”

The 24-year-old second baseman, who hails from Valera, Venezuela, was signed before the 2008 season for $300,000 and has slowly climbed the organizational ladder, reaching Double-A Trenton in 2011 and spending the next three seasons there before receiving a call-up to Triple-A late last season.

Pirela, whose highest batting average in the minors is .295, which he achieved in Charleston in 2009, is having a career year. He entered Friday with a .308 batting average, eight homers and 41 RBIs.

“Physically, he can play the game,” Scranton/Wilkes-Barre hitting coach Butch Wynegar said. “[He can] swing the bat, use the whole field. [He has] good hands when he slows himself down. Sometimes he gets a little fast and jumpy. He has some power in his bat, he’s more of a line-drive, gap-to-gap type hitter.

“His bat is his best asset. He’s improved a lot at second base. He’s even played a little first base. The kid is an athlete, you could put him anywhere.”

Indeed, the RailRiders have put Pirela everywhere. He has seen time at first base, second base, shortstop, left field and right field. He has proven to be a steady fielder, with a .976 fielding percentage at his predominant position of second base.

“Defense is going to be an area to work on,” Wynegar said. “He feels so comfortable with a bat in his hands, defense has lagged behind just a hair…He needs to work on continuing to turn the double play.”

Wynegar said if Pirela gets called up to the Yankees, he could give Joe Girardi a lot of options.

“I could see him [eventually] being a No. 2 hitter,” he said. “When he first gets there, to get his feet wet, he’ll be at the bottom part of the order. I think he can play second and give the manager some real options in terms of versatility.”

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Yankees’ Chase Headley thriving in new Bronx digs

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Chase Headley (left), congratulating Ihciro Suzuki on his three-run homer Friday night, is hitting .429 in his first four games as a Yankee.

When Chase Headley switched uniforms, his position in the standings wasn’t the only thing to change.

In his brief Yankees career, so has his luck.

The new third baseman, hitting .429 (6-for-14) through four games in The Bronx, produced his first multi-hit game for the Yankees on Friday night, going 3-for-4 in a come-from-behind 6-4 victory over the Blue Jays. He even had a bloop double down the left-field line, the kind of hit that eluded him this year in San Diego as he hit an anemic .229 while playing his home games at spacious Petco Park.

“It was perfect, wasn’t it?” he said, cracking a smile. “Haven’t had many of those in the first half of the year.”

He wasn’t part of many wins like Friday night’s with the dormant Padres, as the Yankees rallied from a three-run, first-inning hole to their seventh victory in eight games since the All-Star break. Headley had a big role. He singled and scored in the second and singled and scored again in the third, this time on Ichiro Suzuki’s three-run homer.

“I feel comfortable at the plate, I feel like I’m swinging at pitches for the most part I want to,” Headley said. “Sometimes, hitting is streaky, so when you’re swinging the ball well, things go your way. That’s how things have been going.”

Most importantly for Headley, when he arrives at the ballpark, he feels a tangible energy, the energy of excited fans and the Yankees pushing for October baseball after missing out on the playoffs last year.

“Coming from a team that was really not playing for a whole lot and coming into a pennant race, that’s great,” he said. “But also there’s something different about putting the pinstripes on. It’s a privilege, and I take it that way.”

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Yankees offense provides big cushion and David Robertson, bullpen use every bit of it in 12-11 win over Texas

Mark Teixeira and Brett Gardner hit home runs, offense puts together big inning but bullpen makes it interesting.

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Chase Headley and Zoilo Almonte get some high-fives after scoring in a big sixth inning for the Yankees in a 12-11 win over the Rangers on Tuesday night.

ARLINGTON — Tuesday night was all lined up to be one of the Yankees’ best wins of the season. By the ninth inning, it looked like it might be their worst loss.

The Bombers exploded for seven runs in the sixth inning, then survived a bullpen meltdown for a nail-biting 12-11 win over the Rangers.

“It was a strange game, but it’s great to get out of here with a win,” Joe Girardi said. “It would have been a really difficult one to lose.”

The bottom five hitters in the lineup combined to drive in eight runs, including two each from Carlos Beltran, Zoilo Almonte and Brendan Ryan. Brett Gardner went 4-for-5 with a home run, two doubles and three runs scored, while Mark Teixeira went deep in his first start since July 20, also scoring three times.

“Let (the bullpen) have a hiccup because they’ve been picking us up all year long,” Teixeira said. “We haven’t been picking them up. It was kind of our night for the offense to pick those guys up.”

Brandon McCarthy wasn’t as good as he was in his first three starts with the Yankees, but the righthander improved to 3-0 with six innings of four-run ball.

The bullpen made things interesting as Adam Warren loaded the bases in the seventh and Dellin Betances gave up a grand slam by J.P. Arencibia, who had two homers and seven RBI in the game.

Teixeira’s homer got the lead back to four, but Chase Whitley allowed a run in the eighth and David Robertson allowed two runs in the ninth to allow Texas to pull within a run. The Rangers had the bases loaded before Robertson got Adrian Beltre to fly out to end the game, recording his 27th save.

“That’s about as bad as you can suck out there and still get lucky enough to get one of the better hitters in baseball out and not lose the ballgame,” said Robertson, who gave up two hits and walked three. “The offense really stepped up today. I wish the bullpen would have done a little bit better, but we got a win. We’ll take it.”

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Brett Gardner's unlikely home-run binge continues in Texas.

The Yankees had reached double digits in runs only two other times this season: April 17 at Tampa Bay and April 24 at Boston.

The Yankees remain 4.5 games behind the first-place Orioles in the AL East and two games behind the Blue Jays in the race for the second AL wild-card spot.

Gardner continued his hot streak with a leadoff home run, his third blast in two days and sixth of July. The Rangers rallied for three runs in the third — all with two out — against McCarthy, who also gave up a solo shot to right by Arencibia in the fifth.

The Yankees broke the game open — or so it seemed at the time — with seven runs in the sixth inning. Beltran and Ryan each had two-run hits to help the Bombers turn a three-run deficit into a 7-4 lead.

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Mark Teixeira plays first base for the first time since coming off the DL and homers in the game.

As bad as the inning was, it only got worse for Texas. Gardner drilled a ball to right-center that glanced off Alex Rios’ glove and ricocheted into Leonys Martin’s head, the three-base error bringing him another run to cap the Yankees’ seven-run frame — their biggest inning since last Sept. 2.

Warren came in for the seventh with a six-run lead, but he walked two batters and gave up a hit, loading the bases.

Girardi wasted no time in bringing in Betances, but Arencibia drilled a 97 mph fastball into the left-field seats, slicing the lead down to two.

“I’m just trying to throw a strike in that situation; bases loaded, 3-2, I don’t want to walk him,” Betances said. “It wasn’t a strike, but he put a good swing on it.”

Teixeira pushed the lead back to four with a two-run homer in the eighth against Neal Cotts, his team-high 18th home run of the season.

“Very encouraged,” Teixeira said. “I haven’t been able to swing the bat like that righthanded in quite some time.”

Teixeira’s blast turned out to be the game-winner as Robertson endured one of his worst innings of the season before finally nailing it down in the ninth.

“I feel like the luckiest guy on Earth right now for escaping that inning as bad as I pitched,” Robertson said. “It was by the skin of my teeth that I got it done.”

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Yankees' Michael Pineda will make rehab start

Pineda threw 45 pitches in three innings of a simulated game on Tuesday in Tampa.

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Michael Pineda is expected to throw four innings and 60-65 pitches.

ARLINGTON, Tex. — The clock on Michael Pineda’s return starts Sunday.

That’s when Pineda will make his first rehab start since going on the disabled list in early May. He’ll throw four innings and 60-65 pitches.

“He will make a start somewhere,” Joe Girardi said. “Not exactly sure where it’s going to be. They were talking about that today, but it will be a regular game.”

Pineda threw 45 pitches in three innings of a simulated game on Tuesday in Tampa, coming through without any problems. The 25-year-old has been out for three months with a strained muscle in his right shoulder, but Sunday will kick off his 30-day rehab assignment, lining him up for a return to the rotation sometime in August.

“I think you’ve got to get him to where he can go 90 pitches, and you feel good about it (and) where he’s not fatiguing,” Girardi said. “I think if you get there, then he’s a guy you think about.”

Pineda was 2-2 with a 1.83 ERA in four starts before being slapped with a 10-game suspension for using pine tar during a start against the Red Sox on April 23. He suffered his injury later that week while pitching a simulated game in Tampa.

The Yanks’ rotation has held up despite injuries to four of the five regular starters, but Pineda’s return should help bolster a unit that has already used 11 pitchers.

BACK IN PLACE

Mark Teixeira, who pinch-hit Monday night, returned to the starting lineup for the first time since July 20. Teixeira’s return meant Brian McCann could take his rightful place behind the plate after subbing at first base for the past seven games.

“I’m sure he’s glad to be back there,” Girardi said of McCann. “I thought he did a decent job for us. It’s not easy.”

Teixeira made his presence felt at the plate, walking three times, scoring three times while his one hit, a two-run homer (18th) in the eighth, gave the Yanks a 12-8 lead. . . . Brendan Ryan started at second base for the third time in the past week as Brian Roberts was given another night off. Roberts is 1-for-14 over his past four games and 7-for-41 dating back to July 12. Ryan went 2-for-5 with a double and two RBI.

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Brandon McCarthy of the New York Yankees pitches against the Texas Rangers in the bottom of the third inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on July 29, 2014 in Arlington, Texas.

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Derek Jeter of the New York Yankees hits an infield single against the Texas Rangers in the top of the sixth inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on July 29, 2014 in Arlington, Texas.

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(EDITORS NOTE: Image has been converted to black and white.) Derek Jeter of the New York Yankees walks back to the dugout after striking out against the Texas Rangers in the top of the seventh inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on July 29, 2014 in Arlington, Texas.

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Dellin Betances of the New York Yankees pitches against the Texas Rangers in the bottom of the seventh inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on July 29, 2014 in Arlington, Texas.

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Brendan Ryan of the New York Yankees makes the throw to first for the out against the Texas Rangers in the bottom of the eighth inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on July 29, 2014 in Arlington, Texas.

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Chase Whitley of the New York Yankees pitches against the Texas Rangers in the bottom of the ninth inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on July 29, 2014 in Arlington, Texas.

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I'm so glad we won't have to see more of Brian Roberts. I liked the guy, four or five years ago. Now he just seems...old!
I'm not sure Drew will be much of an upgrade though... Still, I never thought I'd have to thank the Red Sox for taking Johnson. Or for anything. We can always thank them for being in 'Implosion Mode'...

Prado will be a useful player. At least he has been all through his career.

You guys think we'll regret sending Murphy away instead of Cervelli? I'm kind of torn on that one.



EDIT: Someone had told me the Yankees sent a young catcher to the D'backs and I assumed it was Murphy. I don't know enough about O'brien to really have an opinion, but his numbers seemed promising. I've also read that he has no real position on the field and that his bat won't adapt well to the Majors, but with prospects who knows, really?

Edited by sabugo

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